Climate Change

Biden to announce over $600 million for 'climate adaption projects'

According to the Biden administration, this plan is part of "the most ambitious climate agenda in American history."

President Joe Biden listens during the fourth virtual Major Economies Forum on energy and climate.
Patrick Semansky / AP
SMS

U.S. President Joe Biden will unveil a $600 million investment in projects specifically designed to address the challenges of climate change during a visit to Palo Alto, California, on Monday.

President Biden will tour the Lucy Evans Baylands Nature Interpretive Center and Preserve, where efforts are being made to protect homes and infrastructure from climate impacts.

There, the president is expected to announce the investment plan that is part of his "Investing in America" agenda. The plan will focus on safeguarding the power grid and preparing coastal communities for extreme weather events.

"The funding will support innovative coastal resilience and adaptation solutions, such as building natural infrastructure, planning and preparing for community-led relocation, and protecting public access to coastal natural resources, that protect communities and ecosystems from sea level rise, tidal flooding, hurricanes, storm surge, among other severe climate impacts," the Biden administration said in a statement.

Climate change blamed for wildfire smoke impacting the US
Climate change blamed for wildfire smoke impacting the US

Climate change blamed for wildfire smoke impacting the US

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Additionally, President Biden is expected to emphasize his administration's commitment to combating climate change, creating clean energy jobs, and preserving the environment for future generations.Some of the topics will include: how the U.S. plans to invest in climate resilience and adaptation, enhance drought resilience across the west, combat the growing threat of wildfires, and reduce flood risk for households and communities.

According to the administration, this plan is part of "the most ambitious climate agenda in American history, and this critical work could not come at a more urgent time for the over 100 million Americans personally affected by extreme weather events."