Business

Chick-fil-A may owe you a $29 gift card. Time's almost up to claim it

Those who are eligible must submit a claim form by Feb. 15. The payouts apply to delivery customers in select states.

The exterior of a Chick-fil-A restaurant
Mike Stewart / AP
SMS

Chick-fil-A may owe you a $29 gift card — but time is running out to claim it.

The money is part of a $4.4 million settlement related to a lawsuit alleging the company advertised free or low-cost delivery fees of only $2.99 or $3.99, but sneakily raised food prices for delivery orders. The restaurant chain did not admit guilt through its settlement.

"Chick-fil-A secretly marks up food prices for delivery orders by a hefty 25-30%," says the complaint obtained by thetakeout.com. "In other words, the identical order of a 30-count chicken nuggets costs approximately $5-6 more when ordered for delivery than when ordered via the same mobile app for pickup, or when ordered in-store." 

The suit claims Chick-fil-A misled customers by not disclosing the markups.

Anyone who ordered Chick-fil-A delivery through the company's app or website between Nov. 1, 2019, and April 30, 2021, could be eligible for up to $29.25. The payouts apply to customers in California, Florida, Georgia, New Jersey and New York.

Those entitled to a payout may opt for a cash payout in the same amount rather than an electronic gift card. Chick-fil-A has allotted $1.45 million for cash payouts and $2.95 million for e-gift cards.

Customers have until Feb. 15 to submit a claim form.