World

Mexican Students Aren't In Mass Graves, So Where Are They?

Mexico's attorney general said none of the remains found in a recently-discovered mass grave belong to the 43 students who went missing last month.

Mexican Students Aren't In Mass Graves, So Where Are They?
Government of Guerrero
SMS

Mexico's attorney general said Tuesday none of the remains found in a recently-discovered mass grave belong to the 43 students who went missing last month.

Al Jazeera reports Attorney General Jesus Murillo Karam said the DNA results of the 28 bodies "do not correspond" to any of the students who went missing in the city of Iguala.

The mass graves were discovered earlier this month. The fact that dozens of student protestors has disappeared the week before hinted at whose graves they might be.

But Tuesday's announcement means there are two big unanswered questions: whose bodies are in the graves and where are the missing students?

Officials haven't said who they think the graves might belong to, but Karam hinted at the students' fate, saying 14 police officers have been arrested for "handing the students over to a drugs gang." 

That brings the total number of arrests over the disappearance up to around 50, most of them police accused of working with the cartels. (Video via Euronews)

This follows days of unrest in Guerrero that has boiled over in lieu of the government's handling of the situation. Protesters took to the streets and attacked local police, set to fire to buildings and smashed through windows in its capital city, Chilpancingo. 

Earlier Tuesday, federal authorities also said the alleged leader of the Mexican drug ring linked to the students' disappearance was killed by police forces at his home just south of Mexico City.

As a precautionary measure due to the ongoing violence, the United States issued a warning to Americans over the weekend to “defer non-essential travel to all parts” of Guerrero except for a handful of cities.