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Norwegian Lawmakers Nominate Snowden For Nobel Peace Prize

Two Norwegian politicians credit Snowden with sparking the public discussion about surveillance and privacy.

Norwegian Lawmakers Nominate Snowden For Nobel Peace Prize
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Despite being disliked and called a traitor by some U.S. lawmakers, two politicians in Norway see NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden in a different light and have nominated him for the Nobel Peace Prize. 

The two politicians announced their nomination in a joint statement Wednesday, saying Snowden "has revealed the nature and technological prowess of modern surveillance. ... By doing this, he has contributed critical knowledge about how modern surveillance and intelligence directed towards states and citizens is carried out." (Via Sosialistisk Venstreparti)

Snowden's nomination comes as the White House pursues charges against the former NSA contractor related to the thousands of classified documents he leaked last year. (Via ARD)

Like the newly-published documents that revealed the NSA and British surveillance agency GCHQ had been collecting user data through mobile apps like Google Maps and Angry Birds. (Via Rovio Entertainment)

White House spokesman Jay Carney made it clear in December that there would be no amnesty for Snowden, saying: "That's our position and it's not gonna change." (Via The Wall Street Journal)

In their statement, the Norwegian lawmakers wrote they don't necessarily condone Snowden's actions but that they credit him with starting an important conversation about security and privacy which has contributed to a more "peaceful world order." 

In case you were wondering, the governing body of the Nobel Peace Prize — the five-person Norwegian Nobel Committee — ultimately selects the Nobel Laureate, but nominations can be submitted by anyone who's won the prize before, members of national assemblies and governments of states, members of international courts and even university professors. (Via NobelPrize.org)

There were 256 candidates for the Peace Prize in 2013, so it's safe to say Snowden will have plenty of competition. Still, it would be slightly ironic if Snowden and President Obama both win just five years apart. Obama won the Peace Prize in 2009. (Via Bloomberg

Final nominations are due this Saturday, and the winner will be announced in October.