Politics

Police investigating threats against Colorado Supreme Court justices

Police declined to give specifics about the incidents, saying there were outstanding safety risks and that the investigation was still ongoing.

The Colorado Supreme Court chamber
David Zalubowski / AP
SMS

Police in Denver said Tuesday they were investigating incidents targeting justices of Colorado's Supreme Court following its decision to remove former President Donald Trump from the state's primary ballot.

The Denver Police Department said in an emailed statement that it "is currently investigating incidents directed at Colorado Supreme Court justices and will continue working with our local, state and federal law enforcement partners to thoroughly investigate any reports of threats or harassment."

The police declined to give specifics about the incidents, saying there were outstanding safety risks and that the investigation was still ongoing. Police were providing increased patrols around justices' homes.

Last Thursday, police responded to an apparent hoax targeting one justice's home. The department said it was also investigating that incident.

Colorado secretary of state discusses ruling barring Trump from ballot
Colorado secretary of state discusses ruling barring Trump from ballot

Colorado secretary of state discusses ruling barring Trump from ballot

Secretary of State Jena Griswold said she would uphold the Colorado Supreme Court's decision to disqualify Trump from the state primary ballot.

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The FBI said it was cooperating with local authorities in the investigation.

"We will vigorously pursue investigations of any threat or use of violence committed by someone who uses extremist views to justify their actions, regardless of motivation," the Denver FBI office said in a statement.

The incidents follow the Colorado Supreme Court's decision last week that Donald Trump is ineligible for the Colorado presidential primary ballot. The court ruled that Trump is subject to the Insurrection Clause of the U.S. Constitution, which holds that anyone who engages in insurrection cannot run for office of the president.

The case is expected to be appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court. Colorado's court said a deadline for a ruling is Jan. 5, the day the state prints its primary ballots for the 2024 election.