Presidential Election

Why did President Biden announce his reelection on social media?

President Joe Biden has announced his plans to run for reelection, but the question is: Why did he announce it on social media and not at a rally?

President Joe Biden, Washington Hilton in Washington, Tuesday, April 25, 2023.
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President Biden made it official today, launching his highly-expected reelection campaign. The announcement came in the form of a social media video on Tuesday morning, posted at 6 a.m. ET. 

President Biden promised in the three-minute and four-second video to build on his successes like passing infrastructure. He promised to continue to protect existing freedoms, like reproductive rights.

WHY NO RALLY?

If you are wondering why the president "posted" as opposed to holding a major speech — Marie Aberger, a longtime progressive communications consultant, says it's simple: A highly-scripted, highly-edited video online ensures the announcement goes off without a hitch. 

Rallies take a lot of work and sometimes mistakes happen, like a microphone glitch.

"If one thing goes wrong, that's the thing that is going to get coverage," Aberger said. "With social media launch, you get to go directly to the people. It doesn't matter what else is in the news that day," Aberger said. 

If you flash back to 2019, Aberger says, Biden announced his 2020 campaign the same way. She says few Americans want to actually watch a lengthy speech, right now, anyways.

"I have a lot more time in my day to watch a 3-minute video than a 1-hour speech," Abeger said. 

THE CAMPAIGN AHEAD

President Biden begins his 2024 campaign facing relatively little competition for the Democratic nomination. 

Robert F Kennedy Jr. is running, and so is progressive advocate Marianne Williamson. 

So far, though, high-profile Democratic governors and senators have said no to challenging the president.

Right now, no Democratic primary debates are scheduled.

That is not the case on the other side of the aisle. 

While former President Donald Trump remains the frontrunner, he is facing opposition from a host of others including former South Carolina governor Nikki Haley.

Former Vice President Mike Pence and Florida Governor Ron Desantis could announce their decisions next month. 

Fox News has already announced the first Republican debate will take place in Milwaukee in August.

One potential problem for President Biden is enthusiasm among Democrats.

A review of 8 polls over the last year by the Washington Post shows that only 38% of Democrats want President Biden to be the nominee in 2024. 57% want someone else. 

Former President Trump and Former President Barack Obama both commanded much higher numbers when they launched reelection campaigns.

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